Apr
17

2020

Can What We Wear Impact How We Feel In Iso?

Add your comment...
Can What We Wear Impact How We Feel In Iso?

I don’t know about you, but my days in iso are spent either in gym clothes or t-shirts and shorts. I’m trying to continue to make a mindful effort in order to make myself feel nice, but as the days go on that gets harder and harder. And it’s all ok until a FaceTime or Skype call rings through. I am a big believer in what we wear can impact how we feel, so I suppose now, even though it’s not nights out and after work drinks and events we are going to, our fashion choices just might be more important than even before. For a little advice I turned to my good friend and stylist, Lydia-Jane Saunders.

 

Many of us are now isolated at home and the temptation to slum it with our fashion choices high. Is it important to still dress up or at least attempt to look put together or is it comfort over style at times like these?

I believe it’s a mix. I think it’s important to attempt to look put together if that is what makes you feel better but I also think it’s necessary to forgive yourself for embracing a sloth day every now and again, if that is how you are feeling. If you choose to get up, put make up on, do your hair, get dressed up, great! If you choose to not wash your hair for a week, great! There is no right or wrong, you do you!

 

Can what we wear even at home, impact our mood and how we feel about ourselves, if so why?

Yes absolutely, the more comfortably you’re dressed the more relaxed you will be. If you’re in active wear, you’re more likely do to some exercise (maybe). For me, I know its important to dress up occasionally, just to make me feel better about myself.

 

What if you are working from home, are there any benefit to getting dressed in work clothes during those hours?

100%! I am of the opinion that it is important to set yourself some kind of routine. If you would normally get dressed and leave the house to go to work, consider getting up, getting into something you would usually wear to work, stepping outside for some fresh air, quick walk around the block and coming back in to sit at your desk. Do the same when you would ordinarily finish work. Children who would typically be at school, should consider putting their uniforms on also. It makes you so much more productive.

If you are doing Zoom meetings with your colleagues, you really should be making an effort, even if that means a work style top and hidden PJ pants!

Photo by Kevin Laminto on Unsplash

 

What is the one staple item we should be buying to get us through isolation?

Honestly, a good pair of PJs! Something that you feel and look good in!

 

What if you are living at home with a partner, is there anything we need to keep in mind with what we wear around them?

It really depends on your relationship. My partner and I are already very casual around each other in terms of dress at home, hello no pants Wednesdays. But if you’re usually someone that wears make up and dresses up, then keep that up if it suits you.

I think what you wear is less important than what you do. I love the idea of an isolation date night. For example, my partner and I have ordered an online wine tasting and are going to dress up, (I’ll probably wear sequins) make a cheese platter and go to a lovely little place called The Balcony this weekend.

 

How do you feel sexy with what you wear when track pants and leggings feel so comfortable mucking around at home?

Wash your hair, do your make up, shave your legs, give yourself a home manicure. Basically, a little self care will make you feel sexy. Maybe swap out your grundies for a pair of French knickers under your track pants.

 

Many people are going through their wardrobes with this extra time, is there still a market for selling second hand clothes at the moment or should we be waiting till this all blows over?

I think now is the ideal time to be sorting and organising but my advice would be to possibly wait until everything settles before trying to sell. We are meant to be staying at home so a trip to the post office is not overly “essential”.

You could post on Facebook Marketplace for example but say that delivery will be later on. However, if you’re sorting and organising with a view to donating to charity, now is a great time, for example, the Wayside Chapel in Sydney are looking for donations of winter clothing and I’m sure they are not the only charity. That to me is an essential outing.

 

If people are starting to organise their wardrobes at home, what are your tips for

  • Organising a closet

Create five sections, Keep, Charity, Sell, Alterations and Sentimental.

Be ruthless. Once you have your keep section, sort it into further sections. For example, tops, shirts, pants, skirts and dresses, or into work wear and casual wear. I also like to sort my clothing by colour order. I have a separate section for sequins though and have my coats and jackets seperate also. Sentimental is self-explanatory, your wedding dress, the top you wore on your first date or the dress your mother bought you etc. Invest in some great hangers, plastic or wooden but never wire!

 

  • Working out what to keep and what to give away or sell

Try it on! Don’t just look at it on the hanger to decide unless you are sure that it can be given away. Think about how you look in it, how you feel it in it, how long ago you last wore it. Quality and state are also important, if it has faded or has pilled or has holes etc, it’s an automatic dismissal and should be thrown away. If it’s simply that it doesn’t suit you or you’ve changed your mind consider giving it to charity unless it is designer and you can sell it.

The alteration pile is also important, so many people have clothing they think doesn’t fit well and think to throw it out. A simple alteration could fix that issue. Get rid of the pieces that don’t flatter you and learn new ways to style your remaining pieces together. This is really where having a professional stylist to help you, would come into play. A tip I always give my clients is to turn all your hangers the wrong way around, when you wear something put it back in your wardrobe properly. At the end of six months, if you haven’t worn it, ditch it. Unless its sentimental!

Can I also add that with more down time, perhaps consider working on your style. Below are two ways in which you can do that:

  • Start a scrapbook to define your own style. Think of your style icon or a celebrity with the same body shape and skin colouring as you. Source inspirational images of celebrities, art, design, etc, then review your choices and start to build a profile of your style from the content of your scrapbook.
  • Get to know your body shape and how to dress for it.
  • Once you’ve worked out what your body shape is, dressing will be so much easier and your clothing will sit correctly on your frame. The body shape formula will ensure you look your best in outfits and save you money in the long run as you’ll know that what you’re purchasing will be wearable. I also strongly advise getting to know your colours to ensure you are choosing the right shades of clothing for your skin tone. Google can help, or I can help.

 

I am currently offering wardrobe edits via video link. I will help you sort and organise your wardrobe, work out what works and what doesn’t. We will build new outfits with your existing wardrobe and determine which staples you are missing. I will then send you a colour analysis and body shape report for you to keep on file. Please email me for more details and costing – lydia@lydiajanesaunders.com.

Leave a Reply

Dr Nikki on Instagram